Monday, March 16, 2020

Free Essays on Ritalin

In recent years, more and more kids seem to be on a prescription drug called Ritalin. This drug is being handed out more and more by doctors as a way of treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a complex neurological impairment that prevents kids from concentrating. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates one out of every six students has this disorder. The rate of Ritalin use in the United States is at least five times higher than in the rest of the world according to federal studies. Ritalin is a central nervous system stimulant that is somewhat similar to amphetamines. It was created in 1955, classified as a controlled substance in 1971, and became the drug of choice for ADHD in 1981. It is also used in treating narcolepsy. It is thought to activate the brain stem arousal system and cortex, and, like cocaine, works on the neurotransmitter dopamine. It appears to increase the levels of dopamine in the frontal lobe where attention and impulsive actions are regul ated. When taken in its intended form under a doctor's prescription, it has moderate stimulant properties. There has been a great deal of concern about its addictive qualities and adverse affects. (Long 1991) ADHD is a relatively new disorder. It was introduced in 1980, where it was labeled ADD (attention deficit disorder). In the 1950's, children were simply labeled "hyperkinetic." The term "hyperactivity" was added in 1987, hence the name ADHD. Not all children have the hyperactivity, and thus are labeled to have ADD. ADD is not treated with Ritalin; antidepressants are more commonly used. One of the problems with the label ADHD is that just because a child may be overly hyper, doesn't mean the child is not paying attention. The problem is the child is paying too much attention to too many things at the same time. Some scientists believe ADHD is a result of a problem in pregnancy ranging from fetal alcohol syndrome to exposure to lead in uterus. Oth... Free Essays on Ritalin Free Essays on Ritalin Parents throughout the country are being pressured and compelled by schools to give psychiatric drugs to their children. Teachers, school psychologists, and administrators commonly make dire threats about their inability to teach children without medicating them. They sometimes suggest that only medication can stave off a bleak future of delinquency and occupational failure. They even call child protective services to investigate parents for child neglect and they sometimes testify against parents in court. Often the schools recommend particular physicians who favor the use of stimulant drugs to control behavior. These stimulant drugs include methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta, and Metadate) or forms of amphetamine (Dexedrine and Adderall). My purpose today is to provide to this class the scientific basis for rejecting the use of stimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or for the control of behavior in the classroom or home. I. Escalating Rates of Stimulant Prescription Stimulant drugs, including methylphenidate and amphetamine, were first approved for the control of behavior in children during the mid-1950s. Since then, there have been periodic attempts to promote their usage, and periodic public reactions against the practice. In fact, the first Congressional hearings critical of stimulant medication were held in the early 1970s when an estimated 100,000-200,000 children were receiving these drugs. Since the early 1990s, North America has turned to psychoactive drugs in unprecedented numbers for the control of children. In November 1999, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) warned about a record six-fold increase in Ritalin production between 1990 and 1995. In 1995, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), a agency of the World Health Organization, deplored that â€Å"10 to 12 percent of all boys between the ages 6 and 14 in the United Sta... Free Essays on Ritalin In recent years, more and more kids seem to be on a prescription drug called Ritalin. This drug is being handed out more and more by doctors as a way of treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a complex neurological impairment that prevents kids from concentrating. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates one out of every six students has this disorder. The rate of Ritalin use in the United States is at least five times higher than in the rest of the world according to federal studies. Ritalin is a central nervous system stimulant that is somewhat similar to amphetamines. It was created in 1955, classified as a controlled substance in 1971, and became the drug of choice for ADHD in 1981. It is also used in treating narcolepsy. It is thought to activate the brain stem arousal system and cortex, and, like cocaine, works on the neurotransmitter dopamine. It appears to increase the levels of dopamine in the frontal lobe where attention and impulsive actions are regul ated. When taken in its intended form under a doctor's prescription, it has moderate stimulant properties. There has been a great deal of concern about its addictive qualities and adverse affects. (Long 1991) ADHD is a relatively new disorder. It was introduced in 1980, where it was labeled ADD (attention deficit disorder). In the 1950's, children were simply labeled "hyperkinetic." The term "hyperactivity" was added in 1987, hence the name ADHD. Not all children have the hyperactivity, and thus are labeled to have ADD. ADD is not treated with Ritalin; antidepressants are more commonly used. One of the problems with the label ADHD is that just because a child may be overly hyper, doesn't mean the child is not paying attention. The problem is the child is paying too much attention to too many things at the same time. Some scientists believe ADHD is a result of a problem in pregnancy ranging from fetal alcohol syndrome to exposure to lead in uterus. Oth...

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Black Men And Public Spaces Essay Research

Black Men And Public Spaces Essay, Research Paper Today, when a black individual walks around at dark, they are automatically thought of as being a trouble maker. Peoples will frequently make everything possible to avoid a black individual, be it walk on the other side of the street or traverse a street at a different country. Black Men and Public Space, by Brent Staples, demonstrates merely what truly happens to a black individual when he/she is walking about at dark, or even during the center of the twenty-four hours. Staples uses personal experiences and narratives he heard about other black work forces to turn out his point. He leads off with an illustration of a adult female who was walking down a street in Chicago and Staples was walking down the same street behind her. He noticed that she kept picking up her gait of walking, finally making a slow running gait. Within seconds, she disappeared from his sight, all because he was a black adult male walking down a street at dark. It was because of this one experience that he learns of his ability to change public infinite in ugly ways. Staples describes himself as a softie who is barely able to take a knife to a natural poulet, allow entirely keep one to a individual s pharynx. Many black people today, who are merely like Staples, are mistaken for muggers, rapers, and liquidators. He realized that being perceived as unsafe is a jeopardy in itself. All he needed to make was to turn a corner into a bad state of affairs, or herd some scared, armed individual, or do an errant move at a constabulary officer, and he could weave up injury or even dead. He so moved to Brooklyn, and it is the same here as it was in Chicago. Women will non look at him when he passes by, they have their bags cleaving against their organic structures, and they forge in front as though they are playing football and are being tackled. He understands why adult females act this manner towards him. Womans are peculiarly susceptible to force and immature black work forces are the representatives of these pe rpetrators. He attributes his non-violent attitude to his childhood. In the vicinity that he grew up in, he was barely noticeable against a background of pack warfare, street knifings, and slayings. He was one of the good male childs, and he had to endure as if he was one of the bad 1s. I saw infinite tough cats locked off ; I have since buried several excessively ( Staples 153 ) . He has seen a adolescent cousin, a brother, and a friend all lowered into the land. Due to all of this, he chose to stay a shadow-timid, but a subsister. Other illustrations Staples utilizations to demo his ability to change public infinite are when he was mistaken for a burglar in his ain office. The director called the constabulary and the lone manner Staples could turn out that he in fact did work at that place was to happen person who knew him. Another clip he was killing clip before and interview and decided to travel into a jewellery shop. The proprietor excused herself, and so returned with a large Doberman pinscher ready to assail. He took a intimation, and left the shop. He besides describes a narrative he heard about another black journalist who was mistaken for the liquidator in a narrative he was covering. What is this universe coming to when a black journalist can non cover a narrative without being under intuition that he is a suspect, all because of his race? Equally chilling as this may sound, it is the truth. Be it in a large metropolis or one the size of Williamsport, these sorts of things happen. One could set this theory to the trial. Just base on a pavement for an hr or two on a busy dark, and number how many people will change their way in order to avoid contact with a black individual. One could reason that black people have the same rights as Whites do today. Yes, the fundamental law says so, but what about the right to walk down a street and non be thought of as being a liquidator or raper? Yes, black people and white people are purportedly treated every bit, but inkinesss today do non hold all the same rights as Whites do.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Primary Influences on Individual Behavior and How Motivation can be Essay

Primary Influences on Individual Behavior and How Motivation can be used to Influence Others - Essay Example This research will begin with the statement that influences on human behavior are caused by several factors. Social, cultural, religious and environmental factors are some of the factors that influence individual behavior. Social factors may be influential on human behavior where such aspects like peer groups, family, and other social groups may shape the behavior of an individual. An individual can also be influenced by environmental factors such as trends in one’s life such as demographic factors, abilities, and skills, perception and attitudes. Cultural factors like values, customs, and beliefs can influence the behavior of a person in a society. Religious factors are some of the most effective influential ways to human behaviors. Further, behavior can also be influenced by motivation where it can be used to drive human actions. This paper aims at outlining the primary influences on individual behavior while analyzing how these influences affect the behavior of an individua l. It will also focus on discussing how an individual’s behavior can be influenced by motivation. Behavior refers to how a human conducts himself or how he acts especially to others or to the environment. Behavior is largely influenced by a response to internal or external stimuli thus causing a reaction on someone. An individual can react to various responses to stimuli depending on various influential factors. Social factors are well known to influence the behavior of an individual. Social factors involve actions that are adopted by a person in relation to influencing he gets from other people. An individual can develop a behavior in relation to influences from others that affect his emotions, character or opinions. The aspect of social influence comes from people that surround the life of an individual. Family, workmates, peer groups or the community living within the neighborhood can influence the behavior of an individual in many ways. The influence that comes through so cial factors may be based on forms like, leadership, peer pressure, persuasion, conformity, obedience, socialization or sales activities. An individual is likely to adopt a certain behavior following factors such as peer influence where one may develop a positive or negative attitude towards his parents. Further, conformity or obedience is the form of social influence brought about by socialization with such people like parents, relatives or seniors in the society such as teachers.

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Performance Management System Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Performance Management System - Essay Example This especially most applies on the part of the sales person and among installers. The sales personnel under the marketing department and installers under the technical department are mostly the ones who usually undergo special performance evaluation activities. Although, the performance evaluation activities applies to all, sales personnel and installers are mostly receiving special treatment most particularly in product knowledge activities, as they are the ones who should know more about the company’s product in great detail. This paper focuses on the prevailing performance management system at XYZ Company including the description of the said organization’s performance management system, the type of performance appraisal used, and suggestion and evaluation of the effectiveness of its appraisal and performance management process. Description of XYZ’s performance management system At XYZ, it is all the function of the Human Resource Department to create a produ ctive design and training to initiate appraisal and corrective measures as integral components of its overall performance management system. Shown in the following figure is an illustration of the overall working performance management system at XYZ. Figure 1. XYZ’s performance management system model. ... Thus, the training is appropriate for the Human Resource Department so that the right method of appraisal and corrective measures if necessary should be implemented, accordingly. With this, they could substantially make use of whatever information they obtain at an optimum level. After this, the Human Resource Department will try to delegate the actual appraisal process to the department heads and supervisors in every department. They will then analyze the results and implement corrective actions and measures if necessary. Type of performance appraisal used The XYZ Company uses graphic rating scale to evaluate the performance of the employees. Graphic rating is one of the oldest ways in the evaluation of employees’ performance that involves listing the desirable qualities that the person being evaluated should posses and be rated with from certain range of quantitative or qualitative value (Mathis & Jackson 2011). The effectiveness of the performance appraisal process XYZ eval uates performance mainly for increase of salary and other benefits. Thus, employees have this common notion that performance appraisal is tantamount to having increase in salaries and obtaining additional benefits. On the part of the company, performance appraisal is a motivating factor because only those who receive salary increase will be evaluated in their performance. Performance appraisal should be a form of self-rating in order that employees should know how well they perform and on what ground the company should guide development (Daft & Marcic 2008). Based on this concept, the effectiveness of the performance appraisal process at XYZ at some point will not be remarkable as this would not

Friday, January 24, 2020

The Big Experience on the Golf Course :: essays research papers

The Big Experience On the Golf Course   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Golf is a big experience for me in the first place. Three reasons why this certain tournament was such an experience was because I was the leader of our team. It was for pride against the other players we were playing, and it just was not for the pride it was also for the money and that played a big role in it also. Golf has brought me a long way like going to college and the way I look at certain things now.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Being the captain of our team was a big privilege but it also made me very nervous. I knew that I had to do my part and carry our team because they were counting on me more than anybody else. This was the first time I was ever the leader of the group or the captain as most people call it. Before we started I had a lot of bad thoughts rushing through my head like what if you don’t play good or your team mates get mad because you don’t hit a good shot or that I am not as good as they think I am. This was really a lot of pressure to me, believe it or not. We stepped on the first tee and all my teammates teed off and it was my turn. I teed my ball up took a deep breathe, stepped up to the ball and hit it straight down the middle. My teammates told me â€Å"great shot Dell.† That really relaxed me and I played so good. I was on my game all day long and nothing was going to get my way, not even a tree. I just felt like I could not do anything wrong that day. I kind of felt like I was a machine because everything was just so nice and smooth like a routine would be. Anybody that plays golf on a regular basis knows what I am talking about whenever I say â€Å"my swing just felt so good and smooth.† My teammates were really impressed with my skills. After we were through they were bragging to all the other teams about how good I was and how far I could hit a golf ball. That made me feel good and that I did everything that I could to help out my team. They were really a great team The Big Experience on the Golf Course :: essays research papers The Big Experience On the Golf Course   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Golf is a big experience for me in the first place. Three reasons why this certain tournament was such an experience was because I was the leader of our team. It was for pride against the other players we were playing, and it just was not for the pride it was also for the money and that played a big role in it also. Golf has brought me a long way like going to college and the way I look at certain things now.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Being the captain of our team was a big privilege but it also made me very nervous. I knew that I had to do my part and carry our team because they were counting on me more than anybody else. This was the first time I was ever the leader of the group or the captain as most people call it. Before we started I had a lot of bad thoughts rushing through my head like what if you don’t play good or your team mates get mad because you don’t hit a good shot or that I am not as good as they think I am. This was really a lot of pressure to me, believe it or not. We stepped on the first tee and all my teammates teed off and it was my turn. I teed my ball up took a deep breathe, stepped up to the ball and hit it straight down the middle. My teammates told me â€Å"great shot Dell.† That really relaxed me and I played so good. I was on my game all day long and nothing was going to get my way, not even a tree. I just felt like I could not do anything wrong that day. I kind of felt like I was a machine because everything was just so nice and smooth like a routine would be. Anybody that plays golf on a regular basis knows what I am talking about whenever I say â€Å"my swing just felt so good and smooth.† My teammates were really impressed with my skills. After we were through they were bragging to all the other teams about how good I was and how far I could hit a golf ball. That made me feel good and that I did everything that I could to help out my team. They were really a great team

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Psychological Perspectives for Health and Social Care Essay

Psychologists uses a range of perspectives and approaches when studying how individuals think, feel and behave. Some researchers may focus on one specific perspective, whilst other researchers study a more diverse approach that may incorporate multiple points of views. Each perspective aims to offer explanations for different aspects of human behaviour. The behaviourist approach’s influence to health care The behaviourist approach is based on the concept of explaining behaviour through observation and the belief in which our environment is what causes us to behave differently. The behavioural learning model learning is the result of conditioning. The foundation of conditioning is that a reward following a desirable response performs as a reinforcer and increases the possibility that the desirable response will be repeated. Reinforcement is said to be the core of the behaviourist approach. Furthermore, once a desired behaviour established, irregular reinforcement maintains the behaviour. The behaviourist theory approaches are frequently used in weight loss, smoking cessation, assertiveness training and anxiety-reduction programs. The significance of frequently and consistently rewarding desired behaviour immediately and not rewarding undesirable behaviour is crucial to the success of a behaviourist approach to learning. The principles of classical conditioning have been applied in many therapies. As its name suggests, behavioural therapy is focused on human behaviour and looks to eliminate unwanted or abnormal behaviour. Typically this type of therapy is used for those with behavioural problems or mental health conditions that involve unwanted behaviour. Examples of this include: addictions, anxiety, and methodical desensitization for phobias, aversion therapy and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Practitioners of behavioural therapy believe that behaviour is learned and can therefore be un-learned through therapy. As well as the behaviour  itself, behavioural therapists will look at thoughts and feelings that lead to the behaviour or occur as a result of the behaviour to comprehend the issue at a greater level. Aversion therapy is a form of treatment that utilizes behavioural principles to eliminate unwanted behaviour – as it follows, if all behaviour is learned it can be unlearned. In this therapeutic method, the unwanted stimulus is repeatedly paired with discomfort. The objective of the conditioning process is to command that the individual associates the stimulus with unpleasant or uncomfortable sensations. There are many reasons why behaviour could perhaps be unlearned; this could be due to behaviour in which is destructive or undesirable. These undesirable behaviours come about as individuals associate them with pleasure; the brain learns that, such as, drinking may allow one to feel relaxed a lowers stress levels. This is somewhat fine, however if one becomes reliant on the substance and it begins to take a dominant part in one’s life then this has become an undesirable behaviour. It is one’s choice to unlearn that alcohol equals pleasure. Aversion therapy goes about eliminating this behaviour by attempting to break the association between alcohol and pleasure. The therapy, in the case of alcoholism, involves the patient drinking while together having a negative stimulus directed. The negative stimulus could be an emetic drug (one that causes the patient to vomit when drinking alcohol) such as an emetic drug, one that encouraging vomiting when alcohol is consumed like disulfiram (a synthetic compound used in the treatment of alcoholics to make drinking alcohol produce unpleasant after-effects), or an electric shock administered whenever the patient drinks. In short, then he patient is punished for drinking and, for the same reason a parent punishes a child, a successful outcome is to reduce or completely eliminate their undesirable behaviour. The cognitive approach’s influence to health care Cognitive therapy for depression has its roots in the cognitive theory of depression (Beck, 1967). It is an active, structured, problem-focused, and  time-limited approach to treatment which is based on the premise that depression is maintained by negatively biased information processing and dysfunctional beliefs. Treatment is designed to help patients learn to think more adaptively and thereby experience improvements in affect, motivation, and behaviour. The effectiveness of cognitive therapy for depression has been demonstrated in over 30 clinical trials (Dobson, 1989). The general approach in cognitive therapy for depression involves guiding patients through a number of structured learning experiences. Patients are taught to monitor and write down their negative thoughts and mental images to recognize the association between their thoughts, feelings, physiology, and behaviour. They learn to evaluate the validity and utility of these cognitions, test them out empirically, and change dysfunctional cognitions to reflect a more adaptive viewpoint. As therapy progresses, patients learn to identify, evaluate, and modify underlying assumptions and dysfunctional beliefs that may have predisposed them to depressive reactions. The therapist also teaches (or reactivates) adaptive coping skills such as breaking down large problems into smaller, more manageable steps, and decision-making by cost-benefit analysis. Activity scheduling, self-monitoring of mastery and pleasure, and graded task assignments are commonly used early in therapy to help patients overcome inertia and expose themselves to potentially rewarding experiences. Patients typically require approximately eight sessions to gain a reasonable level of mastery with the model and the skills involved. A significant reduction in symptoms often occurs during this initial stage of therapy. The remaining sessions are used to evaluate and modify dysfunctional beliefs that impair functioning and make the patient vulnerable to future depressive episodes, build relapse prevention skills, and discuss termination issues. According to my research, many patients show a remission of symptoms in 8-12 sessions. A full course of treatment is considered to be 14-16 sessions although severe cases can take longer. Maintenance of treatment gains is enhanced by occasional booster sessions during the first year after one’s termination. The humanistic approach’s influence to health care Humanist learning theorists view learning as a function of the whole person and believe that learning cannot take place unless both the cognitive and affective domains are involved. The individual’s capacity for self-determination is a vital segment of the humanist theory. For example, the humanist theory is used to help post myocardial infarction (a syndrome that involves the inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart); patients regain a sense of personal control over their health care management. The focus of the humanistic perspective is on the self of one individual – which translates into you, and your perception of your individual experiences. This approach argues that one is free to choose his own behaviour, rather than responding to environmental stimuli and reinforcers. Issues dealing with one’s self-esteem, self-fulfilment, and requirements are seen as dominant. The key focus is to assist one’s personal development. Two major theorists associated with this view are Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow. All patients grow with success and do better when achievements are recognized and reinforced. Respecting the whole person in a supportive environment can encourage learning. Learning is also fostered through structuring information appropriately and presenting it in meaningful segments with appropriate feedback. There are a vast variety of conditions that should be encountered before an individual can develop on becoming self-actualized. According to the ‘needs hierarchy’ described by Abraham Maslow, individuals must first secure their basic â€Å"organismic† needs (including adequate food, clothing and shelter necessary to keep them alive). Having achieved the essentials, they next build up and work to achieve: a feeling of adequate safety, a sense of belonging (to one or more social groups and relationship), and a sense of self-respect and social respect. Self-actualization, the drive for one to do all that he desires to do with his life, is something that only occurs as a influence of behaviour after all the earlier needs are adequately satisfied and a state of contented happiness is achieved. For instance, the media create unrealistic, and for most individuals  unattainable ‘ideal’ image, especially for women and adolescent girls. The majority of models exposed publicly are greatly below the ‘normal’ weight for their age and height. In the humanistic vision, human dysfunctions are caused by a faulty or interrupted development process; essentially human issues regarding to immaturity, or commonly of the social/emotional variety. The aim of humanistic therapy is to promote social or emotional maturity and growth. Through assisting service user’s to resume their disrupted developmental processes in healthy directions, patients are helped by professionals in order to grow up and out the of the immature mental and emotional states that contribute to the pain one may feel or cause pain upon others. The psychodynamic approach to health care Anxiety is a feeling of worry, extreme nervousness, or unease about something with an uncertain outcome. The condition gives of an uncomfortable feeling of fear or an approaching disaster and could perhaps negatively reflects the thoughts and bodily reactions an individual may encounter when presented with a situation that is unable to be managed. When an individual experiences the feelings of anxiety, their thoughts may often actively assess the different situations without intentionally doing so; the individual may too develop predictions of how they will cope founded on past experiences. Despite the fact that some anxiety is a normal response to difficult and stressful circumstances, whereas the anxiety level is abnormally high an individual may lack the awareness of how to effectively control the issue. Anxiety can take many forms, and several of these may consist of: An intense physical response due to the arousal of the nervous system leading to the physical symptoms (which may involve the racing of a heartbeat). A cognitive response referring to the thought about the issue and the individuals ability to manage with it. Those which encounter the condition of anxiety may often feel negative about most situations and think unenthusiastic thoughts. A behavioural response which could consist avoidance or unusual behaviour including aggression, restlessness or  irrational behaviour. An emotion response reflecting the high level of distress the individual is confronted with. There is just not one cause of anxiety, however there are a number of factors that could contribute to the development of anxious thoughts, feelings and behaviour. The many factors comprise of: Hereditary – many research has suggested that those with a family history of anxiety are more likely to also develop anxiety. Biochemical reasons – Research suggests that individuals who experience a high level of anxiety may have an imbalance of chemicals in the brain that regulate feelings and physical reactions. Certain life experiences – Particular life experiences can allow individuals more vulnerable to anxiety. Events such as a family break-up, abuse, ongoing bullying, and/or workplace conflict can be stress factors that challenge a person’s coping resources and leave them in a vulnerable state to experiencing anxiety. https://www.psychology.org.au/publications/tip_sheets/anxiety/ References: Euromed Info [Online] Available from: http://www.euromedinfo.eu/behavioral-cognitive-humanist-approaches.html/ (Date accessed 19/01/15) Cognitive-behavioural approaches and weight management: an overview. (2000) [Online] Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10918780 (Date accessed 19/01/15) Cognitive Therapy for Depression [Online] Available from: http://www.apa.org/divisions/div12/rev_est/cog_depr.html (Date accessed 19/01/15) What Is Aversion Therapy? (2015) [Online] Available from: http://psychology.about.com/od/typesofpsychotherapy/f/aversion-therapy.htm (Date accessed 09/02/15] DEPRESSION: MAJOR DEPRESSION & UNIPOLAR VARIETIES (2015) [Online] Available from: http://www.swamh.com/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=9714&cn=5 (Date accessed 09/02/15) Humanistic Approach (2015) [Online] Available from: http://www.psychologistworld.com/issues/humanistic-approach.php [Date accessed 09/02/15] Theory in Humanistic Psychology [Online] Available from: http://www.depression-guide.com/humanistic-psychology-therapy.htm [Date accessed 11/02/15] Psychotherapy (2015) [Online] Available from: http://www.gulfbend.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=10441 [Date accessed 11/02/15] Aversion Therapy – Alcoholism Drug Therapy (2013) [Online] Available from: http://www.the-alcoholism-guide.org/aversion-therapy.html [Date accessed 11/02/15]

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Eating Disorders Eating Disorder - 1235 Words

Eating Disorders Eating disorders are a very serious psychological condition that affects your mind so that you are more focused on your food and weight than you are on everything else. The most known and most commonly diagnosed eating disorders are anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder; however, these are not the only eating disorders. Eating disorders cause psychical and psychological problems, which at their worst can even become life threating. Statistics show that more women are affected by eating disorders, but men none the less can still be affected. â€Å"Age (most common from teens to early twenties), Family history (hereditary), emotional disorders (people with anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder are at a great chance), transitions (moving, heading to college, or anything that can bring emotional distress), and sports (ballerinas, gymnasts, runners, and wrestlers are at a higher risk) also can play a role in who is being affected by an eating disorde r† (Eating Disorders). Anorexia is a very serious eating disorder that causes your mind and your body to be completely obsessive about staying thin; also there have been a few cases where patients have taken self-starvation so far that it becomes life threating. There are many signs and symptoms to anorexia, a few include but are not limited to, â€Å"the refusal to eat, the denial of hunger, social withdrawal, unhealthy thin appearance, and lack of emotions† (Eating Disorders). Bulimia eating disorder isShow MoreRelatedEating Disorders : Eating Disorder1205 Words   |  5 PagesEating Disorders in Today’s World Eating disorders are alive and well in today’s world and they are a major problem. An eating disorder can look like a few different things, ranging from a severe reduction of food intake to over eating to feelings of negativity towards your body shape or weight (Lehigh University). While some disorders can only be found in specific age groups, races, etc., eating disorders can be found amongst all and it does not necessarily have to be pointed towards food (LehighRead MoreEating Disorders : An Eating Disorder1184 Words   |  5 Pagesas an eating disorder. Weir (2016) goes on to explain the origins behind eating disorders in individuals. This topic is important because, in the United States, many women and men suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some point in their life. It is important to know the influences that cause an individual to experience an eating disorder. Genetically, or environmentally, or both genetically and environmentally. Anorexia ner vosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder are eatingRead MoreEating Disorders : An Eating Disorder1906 Words   |  8 Pagesobtain their body goal, thus causing an eating disorder. An eating disorder is a psychological condition that is characterized by abnormal or disturbed eating habits. There are three types of eating disorders; which are Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating.These disorders affect all aspects of a person’s life, including their psychological, emotional, and physical health. There are many factors that contribute to individuals developing eating disorders including: genetics, family pressuresRead MoreEating Disorders And Eating Disorder1573 Words   |  7 Pagesaffects people called an â€Å"eating disorder.† Why did you choose this topic? I chose this topic because it is a very prevalent issue in our society today, and a close friend of mine is suffering from an eating disorder. What question(s) did you want to answer or what was your hypothesis regarding this topic? As mammals, there is no chance of escaping the need to consume food in everyday life. However, when it comes to food there can be a major concern of eating too much or eating too little. Doing eitherRead MoreEating Disorders And Eating Disorder1104 Words   |  5 PagesEating disorder is a serious problem happens in both men and women. Eating disorder is a sort of disease in which a person is having a strange routine of eating like consuming a huge amount of food each time they eat. This can incorporate not eating enough nourishment or indulging. Eating disorder influence many people around the world. The larger part of peoples who are dealing with this issue are ladies. A person with eating disorder issue may focus nonsensically on their weight and shape. EatingRead MoreEating Disorders And Eating Disorder1410 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"An eating disorder is about anxiety and control and healing from trauma and food and weight are just the tools of destruction† (Floyd, Mim ms, Yelding, 2008). An eating disorder is defined as a severe disturbance in eating behavior. An eating disorder, as defined by our text book for class, is psychological disturbances that lead to certain physiological changes and serious health complications. The three most common and most easily identifiable forms of eating disorders include anorexia nervosaRead MoreEating Disorders : Eating Disorder966 Words   |  4 PagesEating Disorders Many people, both women and men of all ages, suffer from the psychological disorder, eating. Up to thirty million people in the world suffer from some kind of an eating disorder. There a two types of eating disorders, anorexia and bulimia, and have several methods of treatment. What is an eating disorder, and what do they cause? Eating disorders are maladaptive and very serious interruptions in eating. They can come in the form of overeating, or not eating enough, they are oftenRead MoreEating Disorders And Eating Disorder1496 Words   |  6 PagesAn eating disorder is an illness that causes serious disturbances to your everyday diet, such as eating extremely small amounts of food or severely overeating. A person with an eating disorder may have started out just eating smaller or larger amount of food, but as some point, the urge to eat less or more has gotten out of control. Severe distress or concern about body weight or shape may also signal an eating disorder. Common eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and a binge-eatingRead MoreEating Disorders : Eating Disorder2461 Words   |  10 PagesEating Disorders Even though eating disorders are less prevalent in society today than they have been in the past, they are still one of the most diagnosed mental illnesses today. These three illnesses have short term as well as long term effects that can leave a damaging toll on the patients’ lives and are very hard to overcome. This is shown through not only the characteristics of Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge-eating Disease, but also through the psychological and physical harm theseRead MoreEating Disorders : Eating Disorder1031 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"The eating disorder is a very jealous and abusive partner. It requires a lot of devotion in the extent that you have to devote yourself to tending to the anorexia. There s not a lot of time left over for adult life,† was stated by Dr. Doug Bunnell, a specialist in eating disorders. Eating disorders effect a variety of people. Age, race, and gender aren’t role playing keys in eating disorders. Not everyone gets an eating disorder, but if they do then, it will more than likely destroy their lives